Bootleggers, a popular restaurant and micro-brewery in the heart of downtown Aurora, was the scene of a fire Sunday night.

Bootleggers, a popular restaurant and micro-brewery in the heart of downtown Aurora, was the scene of a fire Sunday night.

Fire damage seems to be most prevalent in the east end of the kitchen and proceeds upward to an office and dining area above the vault (brewery).

The building at the southwest corner of the Olive Street and Madison Avenue intersection has been the focus of many photos and events for more than a 100 years of the city's history.

Owners Scott Young and Shawn Briggs were still assessing damage this afternoon. While the fire marshal made an investigation, no official report was yet available.

Young led a tour of the facility by the light of a small flash light. One of his concerns was assessing the gas service to the building. If the gas company finds no leaks, he can turn the heat on again. With temperatures predicted to hit the high teens with even lower wind chills tonight, water lines were another concern.

Young said the fire apparently began around 10:30 Sunday night. He gave the Aurora Fire Department praise for the service it provided.

"We are blessed with the people that come here," said Young as he stood in the middle of the main dining area, now punctuated with smoke damage. "We've had a ton of people come by and ask 'what can we do?'" he said.

"We are waiting to hear what we are allowed to do (via health department, insurance company, etc). We have parties scheduled; Valentine's Day is a big event for us," added Young.

He continued his tour to the second floor, which offers a look at a fine building of the early 20th Century. The series of rooms have served as hotel, residence or office suites over the years.

The businessmen converted some space to hotel suites recently. A single and a double suite have been used mostly by corporate officials visiting companies locally, said Young. A third suite was under renovation.

The rooms feature windows opening to the hallway and transoms over the doors, both features reminiscent of the time when lighting and air conditioning were less advanced.

For now, the hand-lettered sign on the front window reads "closed for repairs."