Former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn will provide documents to the Senate intelligence committee as part of its probe into Russia's meddling in the 2016 election.

AP source: Flynn agrees to provide documents to Senate panel

WASHINGTON Former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn will provide documents to the Senate intelligence committee as part of its probe into Russia's meddling in the 2016 election, The Associated Press has learned.

Flynn's decision Tuesday came as President Donald Trump's personal attorney, Michael Cohen, rejected a House intelligence committee request for information, and former White House staffer Boris Epshteyn confirmed he has been contacted for information as part of the House investigation.

Meanwhile, Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin sounded similar tones as they criticized the ongoing U.S. scrutiny of Russia's attempts to sway the presidential election.

Flynn's cooperation was the first signal that he and the Senate panel have found common ground.

Trump's use of private cellphone raises security concerns

WASHINGTON President Donald Trump has been handing out his cellphone number to world leaders and urging them to call him directly, an unusual invitation that breaks diplomatic protocol and is raising concerns about the security and secrecy of the U.S. commander in chief's communications.

Trump has urged leaders of Canada and Mexico to reach him on his cellphone, according to former and current U.S. officials with direct knowledge of the practice. Of the two, only Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has taken advantage of the offer so far, the officials said.

Trump also exchanged numbers with French President Emmanuel Macron when the two spoke immediately following Macron's victory earlier this month, according to a French official, who would not comment on whether Macron intended to use the line.

UN chief urges action on climate change as Trump debates

NEW YORK U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres made an impassioned appeal Tuesday for the world to intensify action to combat climate change and implement the Paris Agreement to limit carbon emissions as President Donald Trump debates whether the U.S. will withdraw from the accord.

Gutteres never mentioned the American leader by name in his speech at New York University's Stern School of Business, his first major address on climate change since taking the reins of the United Nations on Jan. 1. But he said in response to a question afterward that the United Nations believes "it would be important for the U.S. not to leave the Paris agreement."

Even if Trump withdraws, Guterres said, "it's very important for U.S. society as a whole the cities, the states, the companies, the businesses to remain engaged."

Police: Man with fake gun in custody at Orlando airport

ORLANDO, Fla. A former Marine who was armed with a fake gun attempted a "suicide by cop" Tuesday night during a nearly three-hour standoff with police at the Orlando International Airport, authorities said.

No one was hurt and no shots were ever fired, but the standoff caused confusion and anxiety among travelers who were uncertain about what was going on. Part of the airport was evacuated as hundreds of officers stormed the area, some with their guns drawn.

Michael Wayne Pettigrew, 26, was in "mental distress" when police surrounded him at the rental car area of the airport, authorities said. He pointed what looked like a real gun at officers and himself, authorities said.