The suspect in an August 2015 Hannibal murder will spend at least 17 years behind bars, but not on the murder for which he is charged.

The suspect in an August 2015 Hannibal murder will spend at least 17 years behind bars, but not on the murder for which he is charged.

Travis Lane appeared in St. Charles Circuit Court Friday, Aug. 26 and was sentenced to a total of 21 years in the Missouri Department of Corrections on charges of burglary and cocaine possession. He will likely serve at least 85 percent of that sentence.

Lane is the suspect in the death of Jennie Jo Blankenship. The murder case has been continued.

According to a press release, Marion County Prosecuting Attorney David Clayton made no plea agreement and asked the Judge to sentence Lane to the maximum possible sentence of 45 years on the burglary and drug charges. Lane has an extensive criminal history with multiple prior charges and convictions. He is charged as a prior and persistent felony and drug offender.

In the murder case, the Judge previously granted defense motion to suppress the confession of Blankenship’s beating, which was believed to have caused her eventual death. This was on the grounds that Lane gave the confession to a law enforcement officer after requests to have a lawyer present.

“Lane’s murder trial has been continued from the original trial date to reevaluate all of the State’s options. In the meantime, the defendant will serve a 21 sentence on other charges,” Clayton said. “The defendant is 50 years old and in ill health. He will likely spend the rest of his life in prison for his actions.”

Clayton continued, “Although the defendant wasn’t sentenced in the murder case today, Ms. Blankenship’s family was present. I met with them personally and discussed the outcome. While the family would’ve like to see the defendant sentenced to more time in prison, they take comfort in knowing that he will likely serve 85 percent of the 21 year sentence.”

Lane was sentenced to 21 years for possession of cocaine and 10 years for burglary, both sentences to run concurrently for a total of 21 years in prison.